Cloud is a Great Middle

For Ryan Koop’s presentation at LASCON last Thursday, we built a pretty awesome +GoogleMap to illustrate cloud points of presence. We put pins down for most major cloud providers’ data centers on one layer. Layer 2 has a pin for data center locations of some major colo / managed hosting providers. Check out the map:

Top cloud providers and managed hosting providers’ cloud data centers worldwide.

cloud provider map 2014
We made the map not to be exhaustive, but merely illustrative. We picked the providers we know and work with, along with what Gartner is writing about.

The map also does not include every data center owned by these firms, merely the cloud data centers or cloud-enabled data centers. So none of those cool Arctic Sea cooled data centers in secret locations here, just places you would likely select to launch a VM in when using cloud.

Traditionally, scaling business IT required major investments in equipment and agreements with service providers to supply connectivity.  Now, cloud providers have made the investment to provide state-of-the-art facilities, experienced staff, and fantastic equipment distributed across the globe.  Public cloud offers the lower capital costs and on-demand flexibility – so why build anything yourself again?

Developers can build on top of overlay networks to extend traditional LAN or WAN networks to the cloud with added security such as encryption, IPsec connections, VLANs and VPNs into the public cloud networks.  Cloud computing is growing, with Gartner estimating that enterprise spending on public cloud services grew 15% to $109B in 2012, and spending will reach $207B by 2016.

To continue Jim Gray’s famous “Distributed Computing Economics” – originally published in 2003, then updated by a team from Berkley in 2008 – CPU hours, WAN bandwidth, and disc size continue to follow Moore’s law. Jim Gray’s original research estimated that $1 bought 1GB of bandwidth, 8 CPU hours, and 1 GB of disk storage.  The team from Berkley, in “A Berkeley View of Cloud” re-estimated that $1 bought you 2.7GB of bandwidth, 128 CPU hours, and 10 GB storage in 2008.

A prime example of “cloud as a great middle” are the previously cost-prohibitive projects that now use public clouds as global points of presence to create cloud WAN to partners and customers.

Global WANs were always limited to large organizations due to the major investments in equipment and agreements with service providers to supply connectivity.  Now, cloud providers have made the investment to provide state-of-the-art facilities, experienced staff, and fantastic equipment distributed across the globe.  Enterprises of any size can use these public cloud points of presence (POPs) to build a globally distributed WAN. Essentially, anyone with a credit card can use the public cloud to create a new point of presence on a project by project basis.


More notes about the map: Information on locations is based on public information, provided by the companies. The providers were selected based on two of Gartner’s Magic Quadrants. The Gartner Magic Quadrant for Cloud Infrastructure as a Service (available via Amazon AWS) was published in early October 2013. The Gartner Magic Quadrant for Managed Hosting, North America (available via Rackspace) was published in April 2013.

Created & Published: by CohesiveFT on October 24, 2013


First referenced in the presentation “How overlay networks can make public clouds your global WAN” by Ryan Koop of CohesiveFT on Oct 24, 2013 at LASCON in Austin, TX.


And it’s the last week to vote for us in the SVC Awards: http://ow.ly/pNAHm
We’re finalist in the 2013 Storage, Virtualization, Cloud (SVC) Awards. The nominated project, in support of the Energy Savings Trust, is shortlisted for  Public Sector Virtualization Project of the Year.

By: Margaret Valtierra